Intellectual Property Law Courses | School of Law | SIU

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Intellectual Property Law Courses

LAW 562 | Copyright Law | 3 Credit Hours

This course examines how authors, musicians, artists, software developers, web designers and others control the copying, distribution, sale, and performance of their works through copyright law and related doctrines. The course will cover the kinds of works that qualify for copyright protection, the scope of rights granted to copyright owners, and the special privileges that copyright law provides for the public, including the “fair use” doctrine. We will consider how copyright law shapes and is shaped by businesses and individuals who create music, movies, literature, software, and databases. The course will particularly focus on copyright’s response to technological change, including current controversies such as the copying of digital music and the alteration and adaptation of movies by fans.

LAW 563 | Patent Law | 3 Credit Hours

This course surveys federal and state laws that protect intellectual property, in particular copyrights, patents, and trademarks. It also may address other rights such as trade secrets and rights of publicity. The course is intended to provide a background for non-specialists, while establishing a foundation for those who wish to explore the field further.

LAW 608 | International Intellectual Property & Economic Development | 1 to 3 Credit Hours

This course will focus on current developments in International Law. This course will likely cover different topics in international law such as international criminal law, international environmental law, international health law, and international human rights law.

LAW 609 | Trade Secret Law | 1 to 3 Credit Hours

This course allows the School of Law to offer specialized courses in response to new developments and current legal trends. The course is used by faculty to present specialized topics, such as “sentencing,” “homeland security,” current issues in health law, and “ election law,” that may be taught on an irregular basis. It allows the School of Law to supplement its usual offerings in a new area without committing to a permanent course.

LAW 629 | Law and the Arts | 2 to 3 Credit Hours

This course explores the intersection of the law and the arts, including how the law defines art, how the law protects art, and how the law encourages art. Most of the focus will be on the visual arts, but some cases and many examples will show how the concepts translate to the performing arts. The topics covered may include fakes and forgeries, stolen art, adverse possession of art, art auctions, museum trusts, free speech, copyright, artists' moral rights, and the government grants process. There will be a required field trip to the University Museum's archives and a written final exam.

LAW 630 | Intellectual Property | 3 Credit Hours

This course surveys federal and state laws that protect intellectual property, in particular copyrights, patents, and trademarks. It also may address other rights such as trade secrets and rights of publicity. The course is intended to provide a background for non-specialists, while establishing a foundation for those who wish to explore the field further.

LAW 633 | Intellectual Property and Commercialization | 3 Credit Hours

This course surveys federal and state laws that protect intellectual property, in particular copyrights, patents, and trademarks. It also may address other rights such as trade secrets and rights of publicity. The course is intended to provide a background for non-specialists, while establishing a foundation for those who wish to explore the field further.

LAW 634 | Trademarks and Unfair Competition | 3 Credit Hours

This course examines the federal and state laws that protect consumers and businesses from deception. The doctrines covered will include trademark, trade dress, false advertising, and commercial disparagement. In addition, the course will cover related topics such as Internet domain names, trademark dilution, misappropriation, and right of publicity. Part of the class will be devoted to the basic tools and practice skills needed to address trademark and unfair competition issues. The course will cover such topics as counseling clients on trademark election, review the content of advertising copy, preparing and responding to cease and desist demands, and the use of consumer surveys.

LAW 695 | Semester in Practice: Intellectual Property | 3 Credit Hours

The IP Semester in Practice (IPSIP) is an innovative program that gets students hands-on experience in the practice of intellectual property. The IPSIP program allows students to get academic credit for interning at a firm or organization anywhere in the U.S. -- or world, for that matter. So far, IPSIP students have spent their last semester in law school working in Chicago, Washington, D.C., Southern California, and Nashville. The student has the opportunity to find a placement that suits their interests, working in the part of the innovation or creative industries that interests them most. The IPSIP Program is available only to students who have been accepted into the IP Specialization.